Once a leader in conservation, N.S. now falls behind, report finds

“Owls Head is probably the most egregious example we have seen this year of the Nova Scotia government showing their disregard for the protected areas in this province,” says Caitlin Grady

Katie Hartai
Halifax Today
July 16, 2020

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Nova Scotia was once considered to be a leader in Canada for the creation of new protected areas, but in a new report, the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society (CPAWS) says that’s no longer the case.

The non-profit, which is dedicated to the protection of public land, oceans and freshwater, released its annual parks report, ‘Healthy Nature Healthy People,’ on Wednesday. The publication reviews the state of Canada’s parks, celebrating significant progress, noting slowdowns, and highlighting threats.

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Groups Unite to Oppose Owls Head Park Sale

photo Sydnee Lynn McKay

Eastern Shore Cooperator
Posted on March 12, 2020
By Richard Bell

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In a show of province-wide opposition to the government’s controversial decision to sell Owls Head Provincial Park, 23 groups submitted a joint letter to Premier McNeil on Tuesday, March 10 calling on the government to do three things:

  1. “Stop the sale of publicly-owned lands at Owls Head
  2. Protect Owls Head as a legally-designated protected area
  3. Fully implement the Nova Scotia Parks and Protected Areas Plan”
Continue reading “Groups Unite to Oppose Owls Head Park Sale”

Secrecy and the potential sale of Owl’s Head

Nova Scotia Provincial Map of Owls Head Park

Philip Moscovitch
Halifax Examiner
Morning File
December 24, 2019

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… [Caitlin] Grady did raise the issue of secrecy:

On top of losing access to this site, Grady also says the decision sets a bad precedent for the future.

“If the government decides to sell off this property to a developer interested in a golf course, tomorrow it might be a site in Antigonish that’s of interest to a mining company or a site in Cape Breton that could be sold off to foresters,” she says.

Grady says any of the 90+ sites that are currently pending protection could be quietly removed at any time.

“It’s really about sending the message that we do not want to undermine our very extensive network of protected areas that we’re working on, and our parks can just not be put up for sale by the government at their will,” she says.

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