Brooklyn Connolly
The Nova Scotia Advocate
July 17, 2021

Full Article

“This is a species in trouble,” he said about the leatherback turtle. “There’s been a 70 per cent decline in this population globally, and the population is continuing to head in the wrong direction.”

Designated as an endangered species in 2003, the leatherback sea turtle migrates across the Atlantic or Pacific oceans after nesting. They’re the world’s largest reptile – weighing up to 2,000 lbs – and feed on jellyfish. The Atlantic leatherback sea turtles that have been seen off the coast of Nova Scotia are facing a 5 percent population loss annually. 

“This is a species in trouble… There’s been a 70 per cent decline in this population globally, and the population is continuing to head in the wrong direction”

Chris Miller, Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society (Nova Scotia Chapter)

… “The earth is under a lot of pressure,” he said. “Right now, our natural ecosystems are our support systems on the planet. Between the climate emergency and the biodiversity crisis, we’re in big trouble.”

Sightings from shore ‘incredibly unusual’ 

… She said she was especially happy to hear about the CPAWS-NS sighting, because “when you’re working so hard to try and do something like protect Owls Head, just a moment for nature to look back at you and say ‘yeah’ – I think that’s really important.”

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If you’ve seen an Atlantic leatherback turtle and would like to report it to the Canadian Sea Turtle Network, you can call their toll-free number at 1 (888) 729-4667.

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