Water

“The bogs and coastal wetlands of Owl’s Head are beautiful, complex, pristine, and undervalued. Development of the site would completely, irrevocably, and utterly destroy the natural hydrology of Owl’s Head and impact surrounding marine waters.”   

—Christopher Trider

Water. We take it for granted, but it’s important. Owl’s Head has this incredible relationship with water, both on the site and with the adjacent marine areas.

The entire headland of Owls Head acts as a water recharge area. Water is held in the sloughs between the ridges, it filters through the bogs and barrens, then finds its way into the sea at various points. The drainage patterns are a complex, uncharted maze with small ponds and pools, raised bogs, and Douglas Lake. This hydrology is just another layer, another reason to protect the natural integrity of these public lands.

Golf Courses: They use a lot of water and they require good drainage. Constant growing and mowing to get the dense, uniform shoot density means high nitrogen and lots of water. A course can’t have standing water, so the water all has to drain away quickly to …somewhere. Where does that water go? To adjacent marine waters, of course. To get good drainage, you’d need to install a subsurface layer and drainage tile to facilitate this process.

All over the 661 acres of Owl’s Head Provincial park… that the three golf courses will swallow up… Water.

Water is important. The bogs and coastal wetlands of Owl’s Head are beautiful, complex, pristine, and undervalued. Development of the site would completely, irrevocably, and utterly destroy the natural hydrology of Owl’s Head and impact surrounding marine waters.

Stop the sale. Save Owls Head Provincial Park.

Christopher Trider

 

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