How Nova Scotia naturalists forced the province to uphold its Endangered Species Act

Zack Metcalfe
Canada’s National Observer
June 22, 2020

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The Nova Scotia government just lost a 16-month lawsuit to a flower, moose, turtle, two birds and a tree, which, it goes without saying, has never happened before.

Zack Metcalfe

This is the first time Nova Scotia’s Endangered Species Act has been the subject of legal action, and the first time such legislation has been upheld in a Maritime court, setting several legal precedents that could have enormous consequences for regional conservation. […] Juniper Law is preparing for another lawsuit against the Department of Land and Forestry for its controversial decision to delist Owls Head Provincial Park on the province’s eastern shore, and attempt to sell it to a developer for the construction of three golf courses, thus undermining the sanctity of other protected areas across the province.

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Saving Our Natural Heritage Can’t be Optional

Nova Scotia’s treasures are in danger and the McNeil government’s culture is the problem

Zack Metcalfe
Halifax Magazine
February 5, 2020

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The sanctity of Nova Scotia’s protected areas has taken a beating in recent yeras, especially those of the Easter Shore, their significance dragged through either corporate or political mud in order to justify their dismantling, a sharp contrast to the multitudes of money and time once invested in their longevity.

Consider Owls Head, the provincial park reserve slated for enduring protection by virtue of its unique ecology. Our provincial government quietly stripped its legal safeguards then cunningly defended the action as economic development. At present they’re negotiating the sale of Owls Head to a developer, keen to turn this unspoilt wilderness into a golf course.

The uproar against this impropriety has been spectacular, resulting in hundreds of disappointed letters to the provincial government, coming from private citizens and from groups so humble as the Nova Scotia Wild Flora Society. Will the government change course or double down? Either way, this is a blow to the security of proteced lands across Nova Scotia and it’s not the only one.

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